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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
as campaign props, if the president was serious he would sit down with harry reid and begin to address our problems. the house has acted twice. we shouldn't have to act a third time before the senate begins to do their work. >> suarez: and as the deadline ticked one day closer, the president planned to visit a virginia shipyard tomorrow to highlight again how the cuts could harm the u.s. military and civilian defense workers. >> woodruff: to help us better understand the underlying political strategy being used at the white house and on capitol hill, we turn to two journalists closely following the developments. jonathan weisman of the "new york times" covers congress, and margaret talev covers the white house for bloomberg news. we welcome you both to the newshour. margaret, to you first. for days the white house has been raising the specter of terrible things that are going to happen. slowing air travel, people being laid off their jobs. furl owes. border security. problems. now that they see e republicans aren't moving, what do they think about this approach? >> they think it's a very
eternal. the president can sit down with harry reid tonight and work with senate democrats who have the majority in the senate to move a bill. it's time for them to act. i've made this clear for months now. and yet we've seen nothing. >> now, he wants them, senator, to move legislation that passed in the last congress. the last congress is irrelevant right now. you need new legislation in order to pass a bill. >> wolf, what's not irrelevant is last congress we had the tax increase. so now it's spending cut time. the president doesn't want to to the spending cut. we had the tax increase -- >> right now, to avert this fiscal crisis we have right now, these forced spending cuts, you need a new bill. you can't use a bill from the old congress. >> the president -- you know what, and i think scott walker, the wisconsin governor, said it, let the president come out and say, here's where we're going to cut $85 billion in spending. the bottom line is the president doesn't want to cut spending. it's $16 trillion in debt. he doesn't want to cut spending. >> he does want to cut spending but he
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)